SEJ's 29th Annual Conference • #SEJ2019 • Fort Collins, CO • Oct 9-13, 2019 • Contact

CSU Faculty Experts by Topic

AGRICULTURE * AIR * BIODIVERSITY * CHEMICALS * CLIMATE CHANGE * ECONOMY & BUSINESS * ENERGY & FUEL * ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH * ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS * FOOD * NATIVE AMERICAN & INDIGENOUS CULTURE * NATURAL RESOURCES * PEOPLE & POPULATION * POLLUTION * URBAN ECOSYSTEMS * WATER & OCEANS * WILDLIFE

See also CSU faculty experts listed by conference session.


 

AGRICULTURE

Ragan Adams
Veterinarian who works for CSU Extension, food waste, livestock and food patterns. Email.

Peter Backlund
Co-author of 2015 USDA report on climate change, global food security and the U.S. food system. Email.

Keith Belk
Meat industry and safety. Email.

Thomas Borch
Determining reactions influencing the fate of trace elements and organic contaminants in soils. Email.

Patrick Byrne
Fort Collins is home to USDA’s long-term storage facility for plant germplasm, the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, which stores about 600,000 accessions relevant to agriculture. Unfortunately, these resources are not used as extensively as they could be by plant breeding programs. Byrne has worked with USDA colleagues to develop training programs and strategies to enhance the use of these materials to respond to environmental challenges and enhance food security. Email.

Francesca Cotrufo
The link between soil carbon and soil health underpins two of humanity’s greatest challenges: providing food security and agricultural sustainability to an increasing global population, and mitigating global climate change, for which soil carbon sequestration on agricultural lands can play a key role. Dr. Cotrufo is a soil ecologist with preeminence in the fields of soil carbon and health. Email.

Terry Engle
Nutrient metabolism in livestock. Email.

Steven Fonte
Fonte’s research takes an ecological approach towards understanding multiple functions and drivers within agroecosystems and then applying this knowledge towards the sustainable management of soils and farming systems worldwide. Email.

Temple Grandin
Livestock handling, humane treatment of animals. Email.

Jay Ham
Reduce methane, ammonium emissions, CAFOs. Email.

Ruth Hufbauer
Hufbauer works on species that are introduced from one region to another and then proliferate and spread. Many of these species are pests in agriculture. Also, many more species than are successful are introduced, and she studies the processes that lead to success or failure. This is highly relevant to conservation of biodiversity as well, as if we can understand what makes species in general succeed or fail, we can manage pests and conserve rare or threatened species. Email.

Raj Khosla
Precision agricultural practices. Email.

Dale Lockwood
Lockwood’s research spans a range of ecological and evolutionary fields. He has worked on marine reserve design, ecological genetics related to seed/gene bank strategies and rangeland grasshopper population dynamics. He has also been an adviser for local and regional government agencies. Email.

Michael Martin
Role and influence of culture in agricultural education. Email.

John McKay
Genetic basis of traits involved in adaptation to particular stresses, including drought. Email.

Amanda McQuade
Food security and hunger relief. Email.

Dennis Ojima
Co-author of 2015 USDA report on climate change, global food security and the U.S. food system. Email.

Patty Rettig
Email.

Meagan Schipanski
Schipanski is an Assistant Professor of agroecology in the Department of Soil and Crop Sciences. Her research focuses on developing resilient, regionally adapted agricultural management systems. Research topics include diversification of cropping systems, soil health and interdisciplinary approaches to groundwater management. She co-leads a six-state, 10-institution, USDA-funded project focused on developing management and policy strategies to sustain agriculture and rural communities. Email.

Dawn Thilmany
Thilmany is a Professor with Colorado State University, serving in that role since 1997, and specialize in economic development related to local, organic and other value-added food market segments, as well as food market analysis and consumer behavior. She is co-Director for CSU’s Regional Economic Development Institute, is on the leadership team for CSU Extension Food Systems program and chaired the Colorado Food Systems Advisory Council. Email.

Matt Wallenstein
Soil microbial ecologist who studies how microbes drive nutrient cycling, soil formation and decomposition, and affect crop health and productivity. Email.

 

AIR

Jeff Collett
Collett’s work examines unconventional sources of air pollution (e.g., oil and gas, agriculture, wildfires) and their impacts on the natural and human environments. We are interested in the emissions, transport, and gas and particle phase fate of air pollutants. Specific research topics include emissions and impacts of air emissions from oil and gas development, impacts of deposition of reactive nitrogen from agriculture and combustion sources on natural ecosystems. Email.

Robert Duffy
Duffy’s research focuses on energy and environmental politics and policy. He has written about nuclear power, coalbed methane and the need to integrate energy, air pollution and climate policies. He has also written about the role of environmental organizations in policy advocacy, including elections. Email.

Delphine Farmer
Farmer studies how human activity perturbs the atmosphere — and thus air pollution, forest ecology and climate change. We look at how natural emissions from plants are changing in response to climate stress, how the pollutants like pesticides and oil and gas emissions impact air quality, the composition of wildfire smoke and the chemistry inside your home. We build chemical instruments and use them in laboratory and field studies to investigate gas and aerosol chemistry. Email.

Emily Fischer
Email.

Shantanu Jathar
Jathar’s research interests lie at the intersection of energy and the environment. He and his group study the emissions, atmospheric evolution, and climate and health properties of fine particles arising from energy and combustion sources. Email.

Andrea Leland
The Energy Institute at Colorado State University is a hub for energy innovation. We use science, research and collaboration to find solutions to the most pressing energy issues in the world. With cross-disciplinary teams working across the clean energy spectrum, we would be thrilled to participate in SEJ in whatever capacity is needed. Email.

Jennifer Peel
Peel’s research generally focuses on the health effects of air pollution in human populations. She evaluates health effects of both ambient (outdoor) air pollution in the United States and also household air pollution resulting from the use of solid fuels for cooking and heating in lower and middle income countries. Email.

Kristen Rasmussen
Rasmussen’s research focuses on three main areas: (1) cloud and mesoscale processes, (2) high-resolution regional climate modeling and (3) the global nature of extreme events (floods, thunderstorms, hailstorms, etc.). She studies extreme thunderstorms in Argentina. Email.

A. R. Ravi Ravishankara
Chemistry of Earth’s atmosphere as it relates to stratospheric ozone, climate change and regional air quality. Email.

Joe von Fischer
Methane emission process studies; natural and human caused emission dynamics. Email.

 

BIODIVERSITY

Cameron Aldridge
Climate and land use change impacts on sage grouse and ptarmigan. Email.

Joel Berger
Berger works with endangered species (mostly), such as muskoxen, at the edges of Earth — the Arctic, the Patagonia Ice Fields and the Tibetan Plateau. These are all areas of climate challenge where wildlife ekes out a meager life. His 2018 book, “Extreme Conservation,” chronicles these efforts and has been reviewed in NY Review of Books, Washington Observer and some work featured on Science Friday (of NPR). Email.

Randall Boone
How landscape fragmentation can alter the numbers of livestock and wildlife that can be supported on an area. Email.

Patrick Byrne
Fort Collins is home to USDA’s long-term storage facility for plant germplasm, the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, which stores about 600,000 accessions relevant to agriculture. Unfortunately, these resources are not used as extensively as they could be by plant breeding programs. Byrne has worked with USDA colleagues to develop training programs and strategies to enhance the use of these materials to respond to environmental challenges and enhance food security. Email.

Tom Dean
A pioneer in the field of sustainable and environmental entrepreneurship, Professor Tom Dean views environmental challenges as opportunities for action by innovative entrepreneurs who bring market-based solutions to global problems. He proposes that society learn to capture the power of entrepreneurship for the transition to a more sustainable economy. His work combines environmental economics with entrepreneurship theory and looks at the relationship between market failures and economic opportunity. Email.

Erica Fleishman
Fleishman conducts research on ecological responses to environmental change and the management of natural resources in the western United States. She works with federal agencies and industry on responses of marine mammals to sound, and has coauthored curricula on applications of remote sensing to environmental sciences and ecology. She participates in the science process for management of the San Francisco Estuary and for development of habitat conservation plans under the Endangered Species Act. Email.

Steven Fonte
Fonte’s research takes an ecological approach towards understanding multiple functions and drivers within agroecosystems and then applying this knowledge towards the sustainable management of soils and farming systems worldwide. Email.

Chris Funk
Biodiversity using population genomics, models, field studies. Email.

Kathy Galvin
Contributed to IPBES UN report on extinction of species. Email.

Cameron Ghalambor
Adaptation in natural populations. Email.

Tom Hobbs
Population dynamics and community interactions of large mammals throughout the world. Email.

Ruth Hufbauer
Hufbauer works on species that are introduced from one region to another and then proliferate and spread. Many of these species are pests in agriculture. Also, many more species than are successful are introduced, and study the processes that lead to success or failure. This is highly relevant to conservation of biodiversity as well, as if we can understand what makes species in general succeed or fail, we can manage pests and conserve rare or threatened species. Email.

Boris C. Kondratieff
Kondratieff’s current interests include insect biodiversity, aquatic insect ecology and taxonomy. He has published 240 peer-reviewed scientific papers and co-authored four books relating to the above subjects. Email.

Liba Pejchar
Liba Pejchar is an Associate Professor in the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on restoring biodiversity and ecosystem services in the places where people live and work. Among other projects, she and her students study the loss and recovery of birds on Pacific islands, bison reintroduction in western North America and innovative ways to sustain nature and human well-being in agroecosystems and urban areas. Email.

LeRoy Poff
Freshwater ecology. Email.

Sarah Reed
Working with a team of postdoctoral fellows, graduate students and research associates, Reed’s research focuses on three main topics: (1) How to design and steward residential developments to protect wildlife habitats on private lands; (2) How to balance outdoor recreation and wildlife conservation in protected areas; and (3) How to increase civic engagement in conservation. Email.

Melinda Smith
Smith’s research seeks to understand the consequences of human-caused global changes, especially the impacts of climatic changes and climate extremes (drought), biological invasions, eutrophication (e.g., increased N deposition), and altered disturbance regimes for biodiversity and ecosystem structure and function in grasslands. Email.

Sue VandeWoude
VandeWoulde’s lab studies viral ecology in free-ranging wildlife and interactions with domestic animals — specifically domestic cats, mountain lions and bobcats. Email.

Diana Wall
Soil biodiversity, nematodes. Email.

George Wittemyer
Wittemyer has worked for over 20 years on African elephant and other large wildlife conservation projects, focused on ameliorating pressures from poaching, infrastructure development and land use change. Email.

 

CHEMICALS

Delphine Farmer
Farmer studies how human activity perturbs the atmosphere — and thus air pollution, forest ecology and climate change. We look at how natural emissions from plants are changing in response to climate stress, how the pollutants like pesticides and oil and gas emissions impact air quality, the composition of wildfire smoke and the chemistry inside your home. We build chemical instruments and use them in laboratory and field studies to investigate gas and aerosol chemistry. Email.

Stephanie Malin
Toxic legacies in Rocky Flats, effects of oil and gas development. Email.

Jennifer Peel
Peel’s research generally focuses on the health effects of air pollution in human populations. She evaluates health effects of both ambient (outdoor) air pollution in the United States and also household air pollution resulting from the use of solid fuels for cooking and heating in lower and middle income countries. Email.

CLIMATE CHANGE

Michael Bell
Hurricane forecasting. Email.

Michele Betsill
My research on transnational environmental governance explores the role of non-state and sub-national actors in creating new mechanisms for steering society towards a more sustainable future. Although most of my work has focused on climate change politics, I have recently become interested in issues of natural resource extraction and marine conservation. Email.

Becky Bolinger
Climatologist, drought specialist. Email.

Rich Conant
Ways to mitigate effects of climate change, how livestock producers can reduce GHG emissions. Email.

Francesca Cotrufo
The link between soil carbon and soil health underpins two of humanity’s greatest challenges: providing food security and agricultural sustainability to an increasing global population, and mitigating global climate change, for which soil carbon sequestration on agricultural lands can play a key role. Dr. Cotrufo is a soil ecologist with preeminence in the fields of soil carbon and health. Email.

Tom Dean
A pioneer in the field of sustainable and environmental entrepreneurship, Professor Tom Dean views environmental challenges as opportunities for action by innovative entrepreneurs who bring market-based solutions to global problems. He proposes that society learn to capture the power of entrepreneurship for the transition to a more sustainable economy. His work combines environmental economics with entrepreneurship theory and looks at the relationship between market failures and economic opportunity. Email.

Scott Denning
Atmosphere-biosphere interactions, the global carbon cycle, and atmospheric carbon dioxide. Email.

Colleen Duncan
As a veterinarian, Duncan is interested in how climate change impacts the health of people and animals and, most importantly, how animal health professionals can mitigate these negative health outcomes. Email.

Jim Hurrell
Analyses and simulations of climate, climate variability and climate change. Email.

Phil Klotzbach
Hurricane forecasting. Email.

Alan K. Knapp
We work on climate change — specifically increasing droughts and deluges — in grasslands. Email.

Stephan Kroll
Stephan Kroll is an environmental economist whose research focuses on the factors that determines the acceptability and feasibility of environmental/climate policies. His main research tools are laboratory experiments. Email.

Andrea Leland
The Energy Institute at Colorado State University is a hub for energy innovation. We use science, research and collaboration to find solutions to the most pressing energy issues in the world. With cross-disciplinary teams working across the clean energy spectrum, we would be thrilled to participate in SEJ in whatever capacity is needed. Email.

John McKay
Genetic basis of traits involved in adaptation to particular stresses, including drought. Email.

Stephen Ogle
GHG emissions in agriculture, related accounting. Email.

Dennis Ojima
Application of social ecological system approaches to climate and land use changes on ecosystems, carbon accounting, food security, and adaptation and mitigation strategies to climate change. Email.

Keith Paustian
Carbon removal strategies. Email.

Kristen Rasmussen
Rasmussen’s research focuses on three main areas: (1) cloud and mesoscale processes, (2) high-resolution regional climate modeling and (3) the global nature of extreme events (floods, thunderstorms, hailstorms, etc.). She studies extreme thunderstorms in Argentina. Email.

A. R. Ravi Ravishankara
Chemistry of Earth’s atmosphere as it relates to stratospheric ozone, climate change and regional air quality. Email.

Miranda Redmond
Email.

Shae Rupinsky
Email.

Courtney A. Schultz
Schultz’s work investigates how policy can be designed to facilitate improved approaches to environmental governance in an era of rapid social and ecological change, using forest and fire management as the context for her empirical investigation. She engages with a diverse community of social and ecological scientists and contributes to the broader scholarship in public policy and environmental governance. Email.

Russ Schumacher
State climatologist, atmospheric sciences. Email.

Melinda Smith
Smith’s research seeks to understand the consequences of human-caused global changes, especially the impacts of climatic changes and climate extremes (drought), biological invasions, eutrophication (e.g., increased N deposition), and altered disturbance regimes for biodiversity and ecosystem structure and function in grasslands. Email.

Joe von Fischer
Methane emission process studies; natural and human caused emission dynamics. Email.

 

ECONOMY & BUSINESS

Edward Barbier
Barbier’s expertise is in the economics of natural resources and development. He is one of the most highly cited environmental economists globally. Google Scholar attributes over 50,000 citations to him. His book “The Water Paradox” is forthcoming by Yale University Press, and he was asked by Nature to comment on the Green New Deal, given his past work for UN agencies on this topic. Email.

Stuart Cottrell
Sustainable tourism development, travel and tourism behavior, visitor impact management, and decision-making in travel and tourism. Email.

Tom Dean
A pioneer in the field of sustainable and environmental entrepreneurship, Professor Tom Dean views environmental challenges as opportunities for action by innovative entrepreneurs who bring market-based solutions to global problems. He proposes that society learn to capture the power of entrepreneurship for the transition to a more sustainable economy. His work combines environmental economics with entrepreneurship theory and looks at the relationship between market failures and economic opportunity. Email.

Kelly Jones
Payments for ecosystem services, impact evaluation, land tenure and property rights, and drivers of land-cover change. Email.

Dale Manning
Econometrics and optimization tools to understand the use and value of natural resources, including water, land, fish, firewood, and other energy resources. Email.

Andy Seidel
Natural resource-based economic development; economics of: agricultural land preservation and rural/agricultural land-use planning, recreation and tourism management, oil and gas, climate change vulnerability and forest-landscape restoration. Email.

Dawn Thilmany
Thilmany is a Professor with Colorado State University, serving in that role since 1997, and specialize in economic development related to local, organic and other value-added food market segments, as well as food market analysis and consumer behavior. She is co-Director for CSU’s Regional Economic Development Institute, is on the leadership team for CSU Extension Food Systems program and chaired the Colorado Food Systems Advisory Council. Email.

 

ENERGY & FUEL

Kurt Barth
Photovoltaics/ use of solar panels. Email.

Michele Betsill
My research on transnational environmental governance explores the role of non-state and sub-national actors in creating new mechanisms for steering society towards a more sustainable future. Although most of my work has focused on climate change politics, I have recently become interested in issues of natural resource extraction and marine conservation. Email.

Ken Carlson
Environmental monitoring. Email.

Jeff Collett
Collett’s work examines unconventional sources of air pollution (e.g., oil and gas, agriculture, wildfires) and their impacts on the natural and human environments. We are interested in the emissions, transport, and gas and particle phase fate of air pollutants. Specific research topics include emissions and impacts of air emissions from oil and gas development, impacts of deposition of reactive nitrogen from agriculture and combustion sources on natural ecosystems. Email.

Scott Denning
CO2 emissions and climate change. Email.

Robert Duffy
Duffy’s research focuses on energy and environmental politics and policy. He has written about nuclear power, coalbed methane and the need to integrate energy, air pollution and climate policies. He has also written about the role of environmental organizations in policy advocacy, including elections. Email.

Shantanu Jathar
Jathar’s research interests lie at the intersection of energy and the environment. He and his group study the emissions, atmospheric evolution, and climate and health properties of fine particles arising from energy and combustion sources. Email.

Andrea Leland
The Energy Institute at Colorado State University is a hub for energy innovation. We use science, research and collaboration to find solutions to the most pressing energy issues in the world. With cross-disciplinary teams working across the clean energy spectrum, we would be thrilled to participate in SEJ in whatever capacity is needed. Email.

Anthony Marchese
Methane emissions from oil and gas. Email.

Molly McLaughlin
Oil and gas wastewater is a complex fluid that contains many contaminants including hydrocarbons, salts, metals and radioactive materials. In the West, this wastewater can be released in the environment for agricultural beneficial reuse. My research looks at the impact of this practice on soil and water ecosystems as well as crops, livestock and humans that may use the water. Email.

Ken Reardon
Interconnected challenges of food, energy, and water production. Email.

Bill Ritter
Center for the New Energy Economy, natural gas, renewables. Website. Email (executive assistant to the CNEE director).

Walajabad Sampath
Photovoltaics/ use of solar panels. Email.

Sid Suryanarayanan
Smart grid, microgrids. Email.

Reagan Waskom
Water conservation, policy, water quality. Email.

Bryan Willson
Clean energy, smart-grid, air pollution reduction. Email.

Dan Zimmerle
Methane emissions from oil and gas, rural microgrid technology. Email.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

Ellison Carter
Indoor air quality and interventions, particularly in low-income housing. Email.

Eugene Chen
Intrinsically recyclable polymers; renewable monomers and sustainable polymers. Email.

Steven Fonte
Fonte’s research takes an ecological approach towards understanding multiple functions and drivers within agroecosystems and then applying this knowledge towards the sustainable management of soils and farming systems worldwide. Email.

Stephanie Malin
Stephanie A. Malin is an environmental sociologist specializing in environmental and natural resource sociology, governance, and rural development, with a focus on the community impacts of resource extraction and energy production. Her main interests include environmental justice, environmental health, social mobilization, and the socio-environmental effects of market-based economies. Stephanie’s book, The Price of Nuclear Power, highlights these perspectives grounded in community issues. Email.

Molly McLaughlin
Oil and gas wastewater is a complex fluid that contains many contaminants including hydrocarbons, salts, metals and radioactive materials. In the West, this wastewater can be released in the environment for agricultural beneficial reuse. My research looks at the impact of this practice on soil and water ecosystems as well as crops, livestock and humans that may use the water. Email.

Jennifer Peel
Peel’s research generally focuses on the health effects of air pollution in human populations. She evaluates health effects of both ambient (outdoor) air pollution in the United States and also household air pollution resulting from the use of solid fuels for cooking and heating in lower and middle income countries. Email.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS

Michele Betsill
My research on transnational environmental governance explores the role of non-state and sub-national actors in creating new mechanisms for steering society towards a more sustainable future. Although most of my work has focused on climate change politics, I have recently become interested in issues of natural resource extraction and marine conservation. Email.

Robert Duffy
Duffy’s research focuses on energy and environmental politics and policy. He has written about nuclear power, coalbed methane and the need to integrate energy, air pollution and climate policies. He has also written about the role of environmental organizations in policy advocacy, including elections. Email.

Kelly Jones
Payments for ecosystem services, impact evaluation, land tenure and property rights, and drivers of land-cover change. Email.

Stephan Kroll
Stephan Kroll is an environmental economist whose research focuses on the factors that determines the acceptability and feasibility of environmental/climate policies. His main research tools are laboratory experiments. Email.

Patty Rettig
Email.

Shae Rupinsky
Email.

Courtney A. Schultz
Schultz’s work investigates how policy can be designed to facilitate improved approaches to environmental governance in an era of rapid social and ecological change, using forest and fire management as the context for her empirical investigation. She engages with a diverse community of social and ecological scientists and contributes to the broader scholarship in public policy and environmental governance. Email.

William Timpson
Peace and reconciliation, sustainability and diversity. Email.

George Wittemyer
How landscape, human, and climate impact demography, distribution, behavior and movement of at risk wildlife populations. Email.

 

FOOD

Patrick Byrne
Fort Collins is home to USDA’s long-term storage facility for plant germplasm, the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, which stores about 600,000 accessions relevant to agriculture. Unfortunately, these resources are not used as extensively as they could be by plant breeding programs. Byrne has worked with USDA colleagues to develop training programs and strategies to enhance the use of these materials to respond to environmental challenges and enhance food security. Email.

Molly McLaughlin
Oil and gas wastewater is a complex fluid that contains many contaminants including hydrocarbons, salts, metals and radioactive materials. In the West, this wastewater can be released in the environment for agricultural beneficial reuse. My research looks at the impact of this practice on soil and water ecosystems as well as crops, livestock and humans that may use the water. Email.

Meagan Schipanski
Schipanski is an Assistant Professor of agroecology in the Department of Soil and Crop Sciences. Her research focuses on developing resilient, regionally adapted agricultural management systems. Research topics include diversification of cropping systems, soil health and interdisciplinary approaches to groundwater management. She co-leads a six-state, 10-institution, USDA-funded project focused on developing management and policy strategies to sustain agriculture and rural communities. Email.

Dawn Thilmany
Thilmany is a Professor with Colorado State University, serving in that role since 1997, and specialize in economic development related to local, organic and other value-added food market segments, as well as food market analysis and consumer behavior. She is co-Director for CSU’s Regional Economic Development Institute, is on the leadership team for CSU Extension Food Systems program and chaired the Colorado Food Systems Advisory Council. Email.

 

NATIVE AMERICAN AND INDIGENOUS CULTURE

Dominique David-Chavez
Community-based climate research and culturally-relevant science curriculum in Indigenous Caribbean communities to enhance diverse student engagement in the sciences. Email.

Maria Fernandez-Gimenez
Community-based natural resource management, adaptive ecosystem management and monitoring. Email.

Shannon McNeely
McNeely works with Wind River reservation and tribes including Shoshone, Cheyenne, Mountain Ute, Navajo. Email.

Robin Reid
Collaborative conservation, grasslands research in Kenya, Mongolia and Colorado. Email.

Lindsey Schneider
Environmental Studies, Settler Colonialisms, Indigenous Feminisms & Indigenous Feminist Methodologies, Queer Theory, Indigenous Food Justice. Email.

 

NATURAL RESOURCES

Cameron Aldridge
Climate and land use change impacts on sage grouse and ptarmigan. Email.

Lisa Angeloni
Understand the effects of noise and light pollution on ecological processes, inform the public about the importance of sound and light and its impact on wildlife and people, and preserve the natural sounds and night skies of the world. Email.

Edward Barbier
Barbier’s expertise is in the economics of natural resources and development. He is one of the most highly cited environmental economists globally. Google Scholar attributes over 50,000 citations to him. His book “The Water Paradox” is forthcoming by Yale University Press, and he was asked by Nature to comment on the Green New Deal, given his past work for UN agencies on this topic. Email.

Marin Chambers
How forests rebound from major disturbances amidst climate change. Email.

Tony Cheng
Forest governance, policy, administration; director of Colorado Forest Restoration Institute at CSU. Email.

Francesca Cotrufo
The link between soil carbon and soil health underpins two of humanity’s greatest challenges: providing food security and agricultural sustainability to an increasing global population, and mitigating global climate change, for which soil carbon sequestration on agricultural lands can play a key role. Dr. Cotrufo is a soil ecologist with preeminence in the fields of soil carbon and health. Email.

Stuart Cottrell
Sustainable tourism development, travel and tourism behavior, visitor impact management, and decision-making in travel and tourism. Email.

Maria Fernandez-Gimenez
Community-based natural resource management, adaptive ecosystem management and monitoring. Email.

Erica Fleishman
Fleishman conducts research on ecological responses to environmental change and the management of natural resources in the western United States. She works with federal agencies and industry on responses of marine mammals to sound, and has coauthored curricula on applications of remote sensing to environmental sciences and ecology. She participates in the science process for management of the San Francisco Estuary and for development of habitat conservation plans under the Endangered Species Act. Email.

Jacob Job
Understand the effects of noise and light pollution on ecological processes, inform the public about the importance of sound and light and its impact on wildlife and people, and preserve the natural sounds and night skies of the world. Email.

Kelly Jones
Payments for ecosystem services, impact evaluation, land tenure and property rights, and drivers of land-cover change. Email.

Alan K. Knapp
We work on climate change — specifically increasing droughts and deluges — in grasslands. Email.

Rick Knight
Land and wildlife conservation: practice from theory. Email.

Melinda Laituri
I conduct research on water resources using participatory mapping with local communities and indigenous peoples. Email.

Stephanie Malin
Stephanie A. Malin is an environmental sociologist specializing in environmental and natural resource sociology, governance, and rural development, with a focus on the community impacts of resource extraction and energy production. Her main interests include environmental justice, environmental health, social mobilization, and the socio-environmental effects of market-based economies. Stephanie’s book, The Price of Nuclear Power, highlights these perspectives grounded in community issues. Email.

Barry Noon
Tiger conservation in India, the effects of energy development on imperiled species in the United States, climate change effects on wetland birds and promoting biodiversity conservation on U.S. Department of Defense lands. Email.

Dennis Ojima
Application of social ecological system approaches to climate and land use changes on ecosystems, carbon accounting, food security, and adaptation and mitigation strategies to climate change. Email.

Liba Pejchar
Liba Pejchar is an Associate Professor in the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on restoring biodiversity and ecosystem services in the places where people live and work. Among other projects, she and her students study the loss and recovery of birds on Pacific islands, bison reintroduction in western North America and innovative ways to sustain nature and human well-being in agroecosystems and urban areas. Email.

Miranda Redmond
Email.

Robin Reid
Collaborative conservation, grasslands research in Kenya, Mongolia and Colorado. Email.

Robert Schorr
Climbers for Bat Conservation (CBC) is a collaboration among rock climbing citizen scientists, bat biologists, and natural resource managers to understand bat roosting ecology and identify cliff-roosting populations of bats. This project was developed as a novel partnership to identify and monitor bat populations in advance of the devastating disease white-nose syndrome that has killed millions of bats since 2006. Email.

Courtney A. Schultz
Schultz’s work investigates how policy can be designed to facilitate improved approaches to environmental governance in an era of rapid social and ecological change, using forest and fire management as the context for her empirical investigation. She engages with a diverse community of social and ecological scientists and contributes to the broader scholarship in public policy and environmental governance. Email.

Melinda Smith
Smith’s research seeks to understand the consequences of human-caused global changes, especially the impacts of climatic changes and climate extremes (drought), biological invasions, eutrophication (e.g., increased N deposition), and altered disturbance regimes for biodiversity and ecosystem structure and function in grasslands. Email.

Dan West
Entomologist, Colorado State Forest Service. Email.

 

PEOPLE & POPULATION

David Bunn
Conservation management between human settlement and protected areas in the savanna biome, such as South Africa’s Kruger National Park, interactions between Mozambican refugees and lions, and Southern Africa’s wildlife economy. Email.

Maria Fernandez-Gimenez
Community-based natural resource management, adaptive ecosystem management and monitoring. Email.

Kelly Jones
Payments for ecosystem services, impact evaluation, land tenure and property rights, and drivers of land-cover change. Email.

Rick Knight
Land and wildlife conservation: practice from theory. Email.

Melinda Laituri
I conduct research on water resources using participatory mapping with local communities and indigenous peoples. Email.

Candace Mathiason
Email.

Robin Reid
Collaborative conservation, grasslands research in Kenya, Mongolia and Colorado. Email.

Jill Zarestky
Zarestky’s research focuses on educational activities that aim to engage the general public, increase science literacy and subsequently foster sustainable and conservation-oriented behaviors. Specifically, with support from NSF, Zarestky investigates the educational outreach programs of biological field stations, emphasizing people’s learning experiences through interacting with nature, and designs professional development for informal STEM educators at field stations. Email.

 

POLLUTION

Jeff Collett
Collett’s work examines unconventional sources of air pollution (e.g., oil and gas, agriculture, wildfires) and their impacts on the natural and human environments. We are interested in the emissions, transport, and gas and particle phase fate of air pollutants. Specific research topics include emissions and impacts of air emissions from oil and gas development, impacts of deposition of reactive nitrogen from agriculture and combustion sources on natural ecosystems. Email.

Delphine Farmer
Farmer studies how human activity perturbs the atmosphere — and thus air pollution, forest ecology and climate change. We look at how natural emissions from plants are changing in response to climate stress, how the pollutants like pesticides and oil and gas emissions impact air quality, the composition of wildfire smoke and the chemistry inside your home. We build chemical instruments and use them in laboratory and field studies to investigate gas and aerosol chemistry. Email.

Shantanu Jathar
Jathar’s research interests lie at the intersection of energy and the environment. He and his group study the emissions, atmospheric evolution, and climate and health properties of fine particles arising from energy and combustion sources. Email.

Boris C. Kondratieff
Kondratieff’s current interests include insect biodiversity, aquatic insect ecology and taxonomy. He has published 240 peer-reviewed scientific papers and co-authored four books relating to the above subjects. Email.

 

URBAN ECOSYSTEMS

Melinda Laituri
I conduct research on water resources using participatory mapping with local communities and indigenous peoples. Email.

Melissa McHale
Urban ecology and sustainability, water in S. Africa. Email.

Rodolfo Valdes-Vasquez
Sustainable development, design, construction. Email.

 

WATER & OCEANS

Jill Baron
Alpine freshwater chemistry, visitor usage in sensitive watersheds changes the chemistry. Email.

Tim Covina
Watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry, land-use/land-cover change and ecosystem function. Email.

Steven Fassnacht
Snow hydrology. Email.

Kurt Fausch
How humans affect habitats that are essential for stream fish. Email.

Neil Grigg
Water management and institutions, water rights, water supplies, state water planning, water law, policy and regulation, infrastructure development and water security. Email.

Stephanie Kampf
Stream Tracker citizen science, how runoff generation is affected by climate, landscape characteristics and disturbance. Email.

Melinda Laituri
I conduct research on water resources using participatory mapping with local communities and indigenous peoples. Email.

Dale Lockwood
Lockwood’s research spans a range of ecological and evolutionary fields. He has worked on marine reserve design, ecological genetics related to seed/gene bank strategies and rangeland grasshopper population dynamics. He has also been an adviser for local and regional government agencies. Email.

Dale Manning
Water resources and planning. Email.

LeRoy Poff
Freshwater ecology. Email.

Kristen Rasmussen
Rasmussen’s research focuses on three main areas: (1) cloud and mesoscale processes, (2) high-resolution regional climate modeling and (3) the global nature of extreme events (floods, thunderstorms, hailstorms, etc.). She studies extreme thunderstorms in Argentina. Email.

Patty Rettig
Email.

Matt Ross
Water quality of urban and mining situations. Email.

Shae Rupinsky
Email.

Meagan Schipanski
Schipanski is an Assistant Professor of agroecology in the Department of Soil and Crop Sciences. Her research focuses on developing resilient, regionally adapted agricultural management systems. Research topics include diversification of cropping systems, soil health and interdisciplinary approaches to groundwater management. She co-leads a six-state, 10-institution, USDA-funded project focused on developing management and policy strategies to sustain agriculture and rural communities. Email.

Sybil Sharvelle
Urban water, graywater, fuel from organic waste. Email.

Brad Udall
Colorado River, water resources. Email.

Reagan Waskom
Colorado water resources. Email.

Ellen Wohl
Wood dynamics in mountainous headwater streams, carbon cycling, stream metabolism, river ecosystem productivity, beavers. Email.

 

WILDLIFE

Cameron Aldridge
Climate and land use change impacts on sage grouse and ptarmigan. Email.

Joel Berger
Berger works with endangered species (mostly), such as muskoxen, at the edges of Earth — the Arctic, the Patagonia Ice Fields and the Tibetan Plateau. These are all areas of climate challenge where wildlife ekes out a meager life. His 2018 book, “Extreme Conservation,” chronicles these efforts and has been reviewed in NY Review of Books, Washington Observer and some work featured on Science Friday (of NPR). Email.

Randall Boone
How landscape fragmentation can alter the numbers of livestock and wildlife that can be supported on an area. Email.

Erica Fleishman
Fleishman conducts research on ecological responses to environmental change and the management of natural resources in the western United States. She works with federal agencies and industry on responses of marine mammals to sound, and has coauthored curricula on applications of remote sensing to environmental sciences and ecology. She participates in the science process for management of the San Francisco Estuary and for development of habitat conservation plans under the Endangered Species Act. Email.

Tom Hobbs
Population dynamics and community interactions of large mammals throughout the world. Email.

Candace Mathiason
Email.

Liba Pejchar
Liba Pejchar is an Associate Professor in the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on restoring biodiversity and ecosystem services in the places where people live and work. Among other projects, she and her students study the loss and recovery of birds on Pacific islands, bison reintroduction in western North America and innovative ways to sustain nature and human well-being in agroecosystems and urban areas. Email.

Sarah Reed
Working with a team of postdoctoral fellows, graduate students and research associates, Reed’s research focuses on three main topics: (1) How to design and steward residential developments to protect wildlife habitats on private lands; (2) How to balance outdoor recreation and wildlife conservation in protected areas; and (3) How to increase civic engagement in conservation. Email.

Robert Schorr
Climbers for Bat Conservation (CBC) is a collaboration among rock climbing citizen scientists, bat biologists, and natural resource managers to understand bat roosting ecology and identify cliff-roosting populations of bats. This project was developed as a novel partnership to identify and monitor bat populations in advance of the devastating disease white-nose syndrome that has killed millions of bats since 2006. Email.

Sue VandeWoude
VandeWoulde’s lab studies viral ecology in free-ranging wildlife and interactions with domestic animals — specifically domestic cats, mountain lions and bobcats. Email.

George Wittemyer
Wittemyer has worked for over 20 years on African elephant and other large wildlife conservation projects, focused on ameliorating pressures from poaching, infrastructure development and land use change. Email.